Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects Everymans Library (TREDITION CLASSICS)

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On sadness The force of extreme sadness inevitably stuns the whole of our soul, impeding her freedom of action. Chi puo dir com'egli arde e in picciol fuoco — [He who can describe how his heart is ablaze is burning on a small pyre] Petrarch, Sonnet Our emotions get carried away beyond us 4.


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How the soul discharges its emotions against false objects when lacking real ones 5. Whether the A Montaigne essay a day keeps the doctor away.


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    That our deeds are judged by the intention 8. Variam semper dant otia mentis [Idleness always produces fickle changes of mind] Lucan, Pharsalia, IV, On prognostications On constancy Ceremonial at the meeting of kings That the taste of good and evil things depends in large part on the opinion we have of them One is punished for stubbornly defending a fort without a good reason On punishing cowardice The doings of certain ambassadors On fear That we should not be deemed happy till after our death To philosophize is to learn how to die On the power of the imagination On habit: and on never easily changing a traditional law Same design: differing outcomes On educating children That it is madness to judge the true and the false from our own capacities On affectionate relationships On moderation On the Cannibals Something lacking in our civil administrations On the custom of wearing clothing On Cato the Younger How we weep and laugh at the same thing Reflections upon Cicero On the inequality there is between us On sumptuary laws On the Battle of Dreux On names On the uncertainty of our judgement On war-horses On ancient customs On Democritus and Heraclitus On the vanity of words On the frugality of the Ancients On vain cunning devices On smells On prayer On the inconstancy of our actions 2.

    On drunkenness 3. A custom of the Isle of Cea 4. On conscience 6.

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    On practice 7. On rewards for honour 8. On the affection of fathers for their children 9. On the armour of the Parthians On books On cruelty An apology for Raymond Sebond How our mind tangles itself up That difficulty increases desire On glory On presumption On giving the lie On freedom of conscience We can savour nothing pure Against indolence On bad means to a good end On the greatness of Rome On not pretending to be ill On thumbs On cowardice, the mother of cruelty There is a season for everything On virtue On a monster-child On anger In defence of Seneca and Plutarch The tale of Spurina On three good wives On the most excellent of men On the useful and the honourable 2.

    On repenting 3. On three kinds of social intercourse 4. On diversion 5. On some lines of Virgil 6. On coaches 7. On high rank as a disadvantage 8. On the art of conversation 9.

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    On vanity On restraining your will On the lame On physiognomy On experience View all 4 comments. Jul 23, David Sarkies rated it really liked it Recommends it for: People who love philosophical ramblings. Shelves: philosophy. A French aristocrat shares his personal opinions 6 January Normally I would wait until I have finished a book to write a commentary, however this book is a lot different in that is contains a large collection of essays on a multiple of subjects. Secondly, I have not been reading this book continually, but rather picking it up, reading a few essays, and then putting it down again.

    I originally read a selection of these essays but when I finished it I decided to get my hands on a complete A French aristocrat shares his personal opinions 6 January Normally I would wait until I have finished a book to write a commentary, however this book is a lot different in that is contains a large collection of essays on a multiple of subjects.

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    I originally read a selection of these essays but when I finished it I decided to get my hands on a complete version, preferably hardcover, and it has been sitting next to my bed for the last two years and I am only up to the second book of essays as of this writing — in fact I have only written comments on essays from two of the books. This, as I mentioned, is a complete collection, however it is an older translation by John Florio, a contemporary of Montainge, which means that the English is quite archaic, though still quite readable.

    The only thing that stands out is the spelling and since there was no real standardised spelling back then, this is understandable. Florio was also a contemporary of Shakespeare, so marking Florio down because of his spelling is sort of like doing the same with Shakespeare and English has evolved a lot since then. Anyway, this post is actually quite long, in fact longer than what Goodreads allows me to post, so instead of spilling over into the comments, I have instead decided to post the commentary in my blog which also allows for better presentation that Goodreads, though not by much since it is Blogger — I hope to go over to Wordpress sometime soon, but due to time commitments I am not able to at this stage.

    E faz tanto sentido na altura como agora. View 2 comments. Dec 13, B. Jan 06, Marc rated it really liked it Shelves: ethics , philosophy. I admire Montaigne's honesty and straightforwardness. He observes daily live and especially his own behavior. The extensive use of latin citations as was common use by humanists of that time was irritating at first, but I got used to it.

    From a historical point of view his longer essay "Apology for Raymond Sebond" was very interesting; in it Montaigne pointedly acknowledges the limitations of reason. My only doubt about this book is that Montaigne kind of propagates mediocraty a bit too much. For him that was in line with the very popular stoicism of his time. Jul 21, Alan rated it it was amazing. Inventer--and perfecter--of the "trial composition," essayer.

    None better, after four centuries, though we have improved lying through essays. We call it "news": global warming? What global warming. NSA Spying?


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    What spying--all legal. Humility is a good quality. Montaigne could have used a little bit of it. This time I am not gonna shares quotes as there are hundreds of them and many are from author's quoted by Montaigne. These essays are the kind of stuff I wish I had read when I was younger.

    It is probably the best kind of eloquence for a non-fiction author - not too heavy on verbosity, matter-of-factly and yet retaining a certain grace.

    By 'Grace', I mean a way of holding oneself, I mean a quality which attracts a natural respect. Montaigne writes with such grace that even if where his opinions This time I am not gonna shares quotes as there are hundreds of them and many are from author's quoted by Montaigne.

    Montaigne writes with such grace that even if where his opinions are very opposite of yours, the difference of opinion becomes irrelevant. It is like listening to some old wise man - somewhat like protagonist of 'Memoirs of Hadrin'. And you kind of know Montaigne won't mind you disagreeing to himself - he says he prefers those whose opinions are contrary to his.

    He speaks of his own opinions with a quiet confidence but with no inclination of forcing his views on others. He perceives the plight of women in his own times and seems to be capable of understanding them but is not moved to ask for equality for them. He also perceives that the cultures termed as 'barbarous' have as much reason to perceive other cultures as barbarous.

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    While he sees also that laws of his time show great injustice to others, he shows a great resistance to changes and revolutions. The essays tend to grow larger as we move ahead and more personal. From general topics to talking about his opinions on different things including philosphical ones Voltaire thinks him to be philospher of best quality to his own temperaments. This last gives you very deep insight into his nature - something better than a biography. We sort of know him or quality of material of which he is made as much as we know Harold Bloom from James Joyce's Ulysses - infact we do learn quite a bit about Montaigne's toilet habits too.

    Talking about oneself with honesty is probably one of the most difficult things to do. When we do see people talking about themselves at any length - we preceive real or imagined complexes these people have. Perhaps this is why we are too self-conscious when talking about ourselves.

    Montaigne seems to be free of these complexes perhaps because like Hadrin he was more or less waiting for death when he wrote - he talks of weaknesses without trying anything to defend himself or showing low self-worth based on them and strengths as if they were gifts by someone else God, nature etc.

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    Not only Montaigne knows 'how' to talk about oneself, he also knows 'what' to talk about when talking about oneself. If only everyone talked about himself or herself like that! He sometimes explains that essays were meant to show his temperaments and so this excuses his talking so much about himself. But it is really some of the essays where he is talking of his own temperaments that are my favorite parts. When talking about philosphical subjects, he talks such as death, ageing etc; he stick to an observational attitude he adopts while talking of customs, his favorite heroes etc.

    This keeps him from getting too lost in his philosphical systems. Perhaps that is why he is not counted among philooshers despite influencing so many of them. Unlike most philosphers, Montaigne understand that he doesn't know it all. Probably ahead of his times in his ideas church considered the book 'dangerous' - he is still open minded enough often admitting there might be good reasons to have opinions different than his own. The essays, especially bigger ones, are really like a stream-of-consciousness thing as they move freely between his thoughts sometimes spending several pages on a thought or idea which has nothing to do with the heading.

    Montaigne didn't edited his essays much which were mostly written each in a single sitting.